Auschwitz Lullaby

Okay, wow, guys–this book hit me hard.  I know book reviews aren’t the favorite thing I post, but I’m so passionate about reading that I just can’t not post them, and this book in particular really impacted me lately.

Continue reading “Auschwitz Lullaby”

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The Pirate Bride

The Pirate Bride by Kathleen Y’Barbo is part of a unique new series being published by Barbour Publishing Group.  In this series, each book is written by a different author and takes us through American history.  The first book starts with the Mayflower, and the last book (at least the last announced one, there may be more coming that are as of yet unannounced) is set during the war of 1812.

A description of the book and overview of the series is as follows:

“Can a former privateer and a determined heiress find lost treasure in 1725?
A brand new series for fans of all things related to history, romance, adventure, faith, and family trees. Continue reading “The Pirate Bride”

Holding the Fort

Holding the Fort by Regina Jennings is the first book in a new series set at Fort Reno in Indian Territory, late 1800s.

Louisa Bell just got fired from her job singing at a saloon in Kansas, and is trying to make herself some money and find her brother. In doing so, she accidentally lands herself a job as a governess for Major Adams’ two daughters.

Major Adams, after losing his wife, needs help raid his two girls at a military fort in Indian Territory. He has no idea how to turn his daughters into proper young ladies and while he has his reservations about Ms. Bell, he is just glad to have the assistance.

There are certain reasons I enjoy Regina Jennings’ novels: the historical western setting, the laugh-out-loud humor, the likable characters, and the unique romances. This novel only had the historical western setting. I found this book really hard to get into, the plot slow-moving, the characters unlikable, and the dialogue and quirkiness usually found in Jennings’ novels missing. I was disappointed in how long Louisa kept up her deception (over 90% of the book), and felt that the romance between her and the major was not believable. They had virtually no chemistry and the only reason that they seemed to get together was their common love for the Major’s daughters. The only redeeming quality of the book for me was the message of salvation woven into it, but even that seemed out of place in the midst of how disappointed I was in the rest of the book. I would recommend Karen Witemeyer’s Head in the Clouds over this book if you’re looking to find a Christian historical western about a governess who falls in love with the child’s father.

Thank you to Net Galley and Bethany House publishers for providing me with an electronic copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own and were not required to be positive.